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September 2016

Boy, it's been a while...that might be because we unexpectedly had over 80 lambs this spring!  Not only does that make you busy in April...but then the work carries through for the rest of the year.

Some of our ewe lambs have already been spoken for...we've become popular with farms out east and further south with sheep going to Massachusetts, Ohio, Alabama, Tennessee and more.

It's almost breeding time again.  This year we're breeding back to our ram line with a blacker face.  "Blue" is the ram of the hour and will have quite a harem. 

We've gotten our first load of hay.  One of many to come.   Ewes are still out on pasture but shortly will be coming up to the farm for the cold and snowy months.

Happy Autumn to everyone!

December 2015

Though the weather has been a mixed bag the last few weeks, the ewes have decided it's time to settle into the barn for the winter.  

If it's sunny outside, they may take a leisurely stroll through the woods and down into the valley, but for the most part they spend their days munching on hay and lounging in the barn.

We've had so much rain, that the river is outside of it's banks and crossing could be dangerous if they lost their footing, so we're just as glad that they're not being adventuresome.  Unfortunately the rain also makes things a bit muddy, so it would be nice if the ground would freeze up!

We are just in waiting and watching mode now as the ewes progress with their pregnancies.  March and April will be busy months!

Merry Christmas to all!

October 2015

It's that time of year when you're in constant preparation of what comes next -- snow and cold!  We're filling the barns with hay, moving this year's lambs onto the last of the fresh grass and cleaning up any remaining vegetation, mislaid buckets, water tanks, etc. before they get covered under the snow.

We're having a great Fall in Wisconsin.  The weather has been mild.  Not such good color here though...too much wind has knocked off the leaves before they've gotten to their peak.

Our alpha ram, Winter, is in with the ewes now.  The younger boys look at him with envy in their eyes.  

Sheep all appear healthy though we won't get a close look until the weather drives them up into the barns and yards.  They will keep to the pastures and woodlots as long as Mother Nature allows.  We've begun making hay available in the barns so when the pastures have breathed their last, the sheep will know where to head.
November 2015

We know the nice weather can't hold out forever.  Our ewes make their way to the barns each night and are beginning to consume some hay.  Each frosty morning though, they make the trek through the woods and out to the frozen pasture.

Years ago I asked our veterinarian about the nutritional value of the frozen grass.  Our down-to-earth adviser said "it's just like eating frozen vegetables, let 'em at it."   

Our sheep want to eat off the land...frozen grass, fallen leaves, the last green forbs.  Sheep love forbs...flowering plants that are not grass, especially multi-floral rose.  This problem plant for many landowners is a treat our sheep love!

We'll soon have to move the spring ram lambs back up to the barns.  That may be challenging as they've been spending all summer on their own in the far pasture.  They may have decided that they don't need our intervention.  Though we check on them every day or two for the most part they care for themselves.

Next phase is catching all this year's ewe lambs and getting their photos taken so they can all be registered with the Scottish Blackface Sheep Registry.
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